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Uploaded January 05, 2016

SOME FOCAL LENGTH


 

Patrick D. Flores' New Regime

 

diskurso.com went out to listen to critic and art historian Flores' explanations about his treatment of Philippine post-WWII art

 


 


photo from artbooks.ph
 

 

text below by Jojo Soria de Veyra
​footage in video edit below all courtesy of Tin-aw Art Gallery's documentation


WE KNOW that the creation of recipes for an art history can also be quite fun, as critic Patrick D. Flores subtly and mischievously intimated somewhere in his video talk below. Fun, even as---to witnesses of a certain art history treatment---it is primarily a (subdued) vehicle for the art historian's aggressive mark-making in his coverage of that given segment in time, in reaction perhaps to previous art histories on that period and its baggage of subjects, themes, concerns, and mysteries. Tone-wise, Flores is never adversarial in his alternative offerings about a period in question and is modest enough to regard his own contributions to art history writing and investigation as humble door-making for others' possibly, or hopefully, better recordings in what might be newly-created chat rooms within a period hall.
 



"We believe this video will amply serve, in lieu of written text, as an extended foreword or introduction to the book's (Flores') approach to the period . . ."
 



     Oh, sorry. Pardon the intervening introductory text here; enough of our opinion-making. This is supposed to be space for Flores' further essaying on the newly-launched book Art After War: 1948-1969, set to sell only late last November as the first of a 5-volume project by a new publisher named The Modern Reader. The series is called Philippine Artscape, and Art After War is invaluably interesting for its---for one---timely contribution to questions about the Manila-centrism and usual bias for modernism in earlier Philippine art history coverage of this period as well as for its re-introduction of artists who (and art genres that) seem to have almost been forgotten or neglected by those same earlier treatments.
     
And, yes, you're right, writer Flores won't be available here for another stint with the pen and will instead, below, only appear in Tin-aw Art Gallery's video recording of his talk regarding the book at the said gallery last December 3. We believe this video will amply serve, in lieu of written text, as an extended foreword or introduction to the book's (Flores') approach to the period, with bonus statements from Flores on art history writing, the difficulty of marketing books on art today, and so on and so forth. Please note those lines that would explain to you why this coffee table book is not like any of those you've already seen, or why its historiography (a word Flores seems embarrassed to use here) would intrigue dictators of significance and insignificance.
     This diskurso.com exposure may also serve as an unpaid advertisement for the book, which is still available at Tin-aw and on several online outlets for ₱5,500. Enjoy the talk:



 

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Text copyright 2016 by diskurso art magazine online.

 

 

 


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diskurso is an independent, Philippines-based online magazine on art aiming to veer away from a present mental landscape replete with the customary peacock and weasel words that continue to service the art industry.